Schnader Establishes Appellate Advocacy Institute

With law firms bulking up on appellate practitioners and the growth of the specialty in general, is there a business niche for refining these attorneys?

Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis thought so, and yesterday established the Bernard G. Segal Institute for Appellate Advocacy as a subsidiary of the firm.

Similar to the Georgetown University’s Supreme Court Institute, the Segal Institute will offer attorneys working at all lower appellate levels a place to turn for a second-opinion on their briefs and arguments before appearing in front of an appellate panel.

The institute’s executive director, Schnader Harrison partner Nancy Winkelman, said the Segal Institute will provide neutral, confidential moot court panels of experts, brief consulting services and educational programs.

The Segal Institute’s moot court panels will be composed of law school professors, former appellate judges, and experienced appellate practitioners, Winkelman said.

“It became very clear to us that the profession would benefit by a focused entity that could assist in improving the level of appellate advocacy,” said Judge Timothy K. Lewis, a former judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and a member of the institute’s advisory board.

Both Winkelman and Lewis emphasize that the institute will be open to any attorney preparing for a case at the state appellate or federal level. Pricing is done on a situational basis, Winkelman said.

— Stephanie Lovett, Staff Reporter

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